People are destroying their Nike gear to protest Colin Kaepernick’s ‘Just Do It’ campaign

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Nike revealed on Monday that Colin Kaepernick — the out-of-work NFL quarterback who generated controversy for kneeling during the national anthem to protest racial injustice and police brutality — would be one of the faces of its 30th anniversary “Just Do It” campaign.

“Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything,” read a teaser for an ad Kaepernick tweeted.

Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything. #JustDoItpic.twitter.com/SRWkMIDdaO

— Colin Kaepernick (@Kaepernick7) September 3, 2018

Some Kaepernick critics took that to mean sacrificing their Nike products.

Immediately, some people began posting pictures of socks and shoes being defaced or destroyed, or declaring they would be soon switching allegiances to Adidas, Brooks or Converse. (Nevermind that Nike owns Converse.)

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Is the Women’s March more inclusive this year?

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This weekend is an important horizon on the U.S. landscape of women’s history: People across the nation will mark the anniversary of the historic Women’s March on Washington. But for some women, the anniversary is another reminder of the shortcomings of the 2017 Women’s March.

Critics said the march centered on cis white women at the expense of women of color and trans women, both groups who many felt had more to lose under a new administration many saw as hostile to human rights. At the start, organizers of the women’s march were almost all white, though they quickly course-corrected by bringing on Tamika Mallory, Carmen Perez and Linda Sarsour.

But some underrepresented women felt their issues — such as racism, discrimination, police brutality, LGBTQ inclusivity, and immigration — were relegated in favor of issues that matter most to straight, white, middle-class women.

“We have to decide: Do we want equality and justice for a select group, or do we want it for everyone, and we know all these issues are tied together,” said Ruth Hopkins, a Native American writer and activist. “Gender justice is related to economic justice and racial justice and we have to think about all these things.”

As the 2018 Women’s March and sister marches converge on Saturday and Sunday across the country, many women are asking: Has anything changed?

Women of color have a complicated history with feminism

Feminism’s long history of perceived racism, combined with what some women saw as a lack of intersectionality at last year’s march, resulted in many black women and women of color refusing to attend.

Intersectionality, coined by law professor Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989, is the recognition of how different backgrounds and the racism, sexism and classism that come with those identities overlap and impact the ways people experience oppression and discrimination.

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President Trump rips NFL for getting ‘tax breaks’ while disrespecting anthem, flag

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Why is the NFL getting massive tax breaks while at the same time disrespecting our Anthem, Flag and Country? Change tax law!

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Study Shows Deep Racial Divide on How Black, Latino and White Cops View Racial Equality, Police Brutality

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Protesters and police officers seemingly have one thing in common, according to a new survey: Both agree that bad cops aren’t held accountable by the police force for poor performance. A recently released Pew Research Center survey conducted by the National Police Research Platform revealed that 72 percent of officers disagreed with the statement that bad cops are held accountable for their poor performance. Just 24 percent of respondents agreed that officers who underperform are held responsible, according to the poll.

The survey, which was conducted in 2016 and involved almost 8,000 police officers from departments across the country, offered a wide collection of data points on police attitudes about their jobs and the communities they work in. One glaring hallmark of the study is the deep racial divide police officers have on issues of Black equality. The study showed that an extremely high concentration of white officers believe that the country has achieved racial equity. According to the study “virtually all white officers (92%), but only 29% of their black colleagues, say that the country has made the changes needed to assure equal rights for blacks.” The views of white officers not only differ from their Black co-workers, but they also are at odds with the greater white population, where only 43 percent of all white adults said no more changes are needed, as measured in the center’s survey of the general public. Statistics also show that 53 percent of Black officers believed their white counterparts are treated much better in their departments/agencies when it comes to assignments and promotions. These views point to a long-held belief that the job experience for Black officers differs even when they try to fit in.

The Pew study also showed a continued racial chasm in the views of police officers over the protest movement that has swept the country over the past three years. Sixty-nine percent of Black officers believed that protesters were in part motivated by the desire to hold police officers responsible for their actions, while a mere 27 percent of white officers agreed that that was the purpose of the protests.

The differing perceptions of police officers by race continued into how they view the high-profile killings of Black people by the police. Seventy-two percent of white officers viewed these encounters as isolated incidents, while 57 percent of Black officers saw the incidents as part of a larger problem with policing. The survey also showed that white officers had a 16 percent higher probability to engage in an altercation with a suspect than Black officers.

The survey further demonstrated how Black and White police officers view the Black communities they are stationed in. Sixty-eight percent of Black officers said the police and community relations within Black communities are negative, while 60% of white and Latino officers believed relations with the Black community are positive. The study suggests that, at times, white officers are oblivious to their actions and the effect those actions have on the communities they patrol. Their concern was only for how it affects them personally. The Pew Research survey showed that the killings do indeed affect officers’ sentiments, but it’s mostly concerning their own safety. After the increased media attention to the recent string of deadly shootings of African-Americans, a majority of law enforcement personnel (86 percent) said they felt the fatal encounters between police and African-Americans have made their jobs harder. Another 93 percent said they’ve become more concerned for their personal safety as a result of high-profile police shootings of Black people.

By Tanasia Kenney/Atlantablackstar
Posted by The NON-Conformist

 

North Carolina Cop Placed on Leave After Video Shows Him Slamming Teen Onto Floor

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A North Carolina police officer captured on video body slamming a high school student has been placed on paid administrative leave, police and school officials said Tuesday. Widely circulated footage shows the officer picking up the female student by her torso and then throwing her down hard onto the floor. The incident stemmed from a…

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Filming Cops.com lists its 26 Reasons to Not Trust the Police

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1. The Police Have No Duty To Protect You 
It’s plastered right on the side of many police cruisers: “To Protect And to Serve”, but this serves as little more then a PR slogan for the public to feel more comfortable and trusting of the police. In 2005 the supreme court ruled in a case titled Warren Vs The District of Columbia it was ruled that police do not have a constitutional duty to protect, all the way to and including against a women who has a protection from abuse order from a husband and is being attacked by said husband. Being stalked? No duty to protect. Locked away somewhere by an attacker. No duty to protect. Being raped? Well, you get the point, unfortunately. The court went as far as to say “”[t]he duty to provide public services is owed to the public at large, and, absent a special relationship between the police and an individual, no specific legal duty exists. ”. Supporters of this verdict will tell you that it is because individuals are expected to protect themselves and their loved ones, which is true, but many states such as New York, and New Jersey get in the way of that with their draconian gun laws, effectively making them reliant on police, who then have no duty to oblige. A viscous cycle indeed.

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Shut up and play ball: Why America can’t handle black athletes who talk about race

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Image: Raw Story

Sometime far in the future, Colin Kaepernick’s  decision to sit during the playing of the national anthem will be heralded as another example of a black athlete using his or her national platform to draw attention to the continued mistreatment of black people in the United States. Undoubtedly, former teammates, coaches, and journalists will step forward to present their memories — seen through lenses covered in vaseline so that the edges are softened and the ugly stuff excised — in which they will extol Kaepernick for his courage and for his willingness to do the right thing even though he had to know that his act would be deliberately misinterpreted by those whose kneejerk reaction to any critique of the United States is to invoke the bodies of American war dead.

It’s especially ironic that the military is used to somehow prove that Kaepernick is wrong for speaking up when African Americans serve their country in the military at a higher rate — 17.8% — than its proportion of the U.S. population — 13.3% — than do white people, whose proportion of the population is 77.1% but who are only represented in the military at a rate of 74.6%.

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