Category Archives: Popular Culture

Mall of America hires its first black Santa

SAY WHAT….What took sooooo long!

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Image: Star Tribune Twitter

Santa Experience co-owner Landon Luther told the Tribune the move to hire a black Santa was a long time coming.

“We want Santa to be for everyone, period,” Luther told the Tribune.

Raised-fist protesters Smith, Carlos support Kaepernick

Image: AP

Tommie Smith and John Carlos were proud to raise their gloved fists in a symbolic protest at the Olympics, and now they’re proud that Colin Kaepernick and other athletes are staging national anthem protests to raise awareness about racial inequality and police brutality.

The American sprinters who were sent home from the 1968 Mexico City Olympics for what they called a “human rights salute” say the San Francisco 49ers quarterback and others are right to use their platform in an attempt to affect social change 48 years later.

“Don’t hate the kid because he stood up for something to change,” said Smith, who won the gold medal and set a world record in the 200 meters in 1968. “He stood up for the right to exercise Amendment 1.”

More from the News & Observer
Posted by Libergirl

First ‘Birth Of A Nation’ Screening Cancelled

Nate Parker, the director, star and producer of "The Birth of a Nation," poses at the premiere of the film at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival on Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, in Park City, Utah. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP)
Image: Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

A screening of “The Birth of a Nation” and a Q&A with writer-director-star Nate Parker that was supposed to take place at the American Film Institute’s Conservatory on Friday has been postponed because of concerns that have been raised about the film, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

It’s the first event involving Parker that’s been called off since he became the center of controversy for his comments about a resurfaced rape trial he faced while attending Penn State in 1999.

His film about Nat Turner’s slave uprising had been set to screen at the LA-based film school’s “Opening Day,” a special screening for second-year fellows (as the students are called) that traditionally takes place at the end of the first week of the new semester. The screening is usually reserved for an upcoming, high-profile release and is accompanied by a guest who worked on the film.

More from Black America Web.com

Posted by Libergirl

 

What the NRA says, and doesn’t say, tells the story

 

National Rifle Association.svg
Image: wikipedia

It didn’t take long this morning for the NRA to issue a statement concerning events in Dallas. And it’s a model of brevity.

“On behalf of the more than five million members of the National Rifle Association, and especially on behalf of our members from the law enforcement community, I want to express the deep anguish all of us feel for the heroic Dallas law enforcement officers who were killed and wounded, as well as those who bravely ran toward danger to defend the people and city of Dallas.

With heavy hearts, NRA members honor their heroism and offer our deepest condolences to all of their families.”

If this seems briefer than NRA statements concerning other recent tragedies, it might be because it’s lacking any claim that “if only” the victims had been armed, this could have been avoided. They were armed.

It’s missing any of the complaints about the horrible effects of gun-free zones around schools or other facilities. Not only was this not a gun-free zone, a number of people were openly carrying weapons.

It’s missing any statement about the need for concealed carry, open carry, or reduced barriers to carry. Texas, and Dallas, “enjoy” all those civilizing rights.

More from Daily Kos

Posted by Libergirl

Nancy Reagan’s ‘Just Say No’ campaign was an absolute disaster — here’s how to end it for good

Image: Raw Story

The phrase with which Nancy Reagan will forever be associated came out quite naturally, when the First Lady visited some schoolchildren in Oakland, California in 1982. “A little girl raised her hand,” she recalled, “and said, ‘Mrs. Reagan, what do you do if somebody offers you drugs?’ And I said, ‘Well, you just say no.’”

After her “Just Say No” tagline caught on, she launched a high-profile, long-lived campaign by that name in 1982, traveling around the US and the world and across the airwaves to promote it. PBS noted, “The movement focuses on white, middle-class children and is funded by corporate and private donations.” She visited rehab and prevention programs and oversaw the formation of thousands of Just Say No clubs in schools and youth organizations, some of which still operate to this day.

Her don’t-do-drugs message, a reassuringly simple balm to a nation’s fears, was widely embraced. It can also legitimately be blamed for a huge amount of human misery.

More from Raw Story

Posted by The NON-Conformist

‘Don’t go there’: Texas teachers told to drop ‘sensitive topics’ for fear of getting shot

The University of Houston is advising staff members to “be careful discussing sensitive topics” and not to “go there” if they sense anger. The guidelines are in response to legislation passed in Texas that will allow individuals to carry concealed guns on campus.

Members of staff were briefed during a slideshow on how to adjust to the new law, which could potentially put them in dangerous situations. Lecturers are being recommended to “drop certain topics from your curriculum” if the topic is controversial, so as to avoid potential flash points.

Image: Brenda Hawkins(Twitter)

Teachers are also being advised not to “go there” if they sense a situation might be getting out of hand and be “careful discussing sensitive topics.”

Staff members are also being instructed to “limit student access off hours” to teaching facilities.

More from Russia Today

Posted by The NON-Conformist

 

A Telling Look Back the Century-Old Quest for Diversity in Entertainment

Image: Variety Magazine

If anyone doubts struggles in diversity, it only requires a quick look at Variety’s 111 years of publication to find the proof.

The history of show business is a history of bias, which can be broken down into three general eras: Humiliation (1905-42) when grossly demeaning terms like “coon” and vile treatment were “normal”; protest (1942-49), when voices were raised in simple requests that demeaning stereotypes and racist images be removed from entertainment; and the struggle for equality (1949-2016), when groups began confronting the absence of people of color in key above- and below-the-line fields. For those who still don’t quite understand the fury behind the current demands for change, it should be noted that this third phase is now approaching its 70th year.

More from Variety.com

Posted by Libergirl