Michelle Alexander: White Men Get Rich from Legal Pot, Black Men Stay in Prison

Image: Alternet

Ever since Colorado and Washington made the unprecedented move to legalize recreational pot last year, excitement and stories of unfettered success have billowed into the air. Colorado’s marijuana tax revenue far exceeded expectations, bringing a whopping$185 million to the state and tourists are lining up to taste the budding culture (pun intended). Several other states are now looking to follow suit and legalize.

But the ramifications of this momentous shift are left unaddressed. When you flick on the TV to a segment about the flowering pot market in Colorado, you’ll find that the faces of the movement are primarily white and male. Meanwhile, many of the more than  210,000 people who were arrested for marijuana possession in Colorado between 1986 and 2010 according to a report from the Marijuana Arrest Research Project, remain behind bars. Thousands of black men and boys still sit in prisons for possession of the very plant that’s making those white guys on TV rich.

“In many ways the imagery doesn’t sit right,” said Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of  The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness in a  public conversation on March 6 with Asha Bandele of the  Drug Policy Alliance.  “Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing?”

More from Alternet

Posted by The NON-Conformist

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One thought on “Michelle Alexander: White Men Get Rich from Legal Pot, Black Men Stay in Prison

  1. That remains one perspective but I would like to allow for another.
    Some of the men own the prisons housing the inmate and will discharge the person because of legal obligation as soon as they can.
    The hate is not segregated, I recently went to jail both in the county and the city; accommodations where better in the county. The city, because of coming from court, saw a white man out of his element. The harassing began upon transfer between the sheriff and bondsman. I had been housed in city jail after an arrest a month earlier, but this experience would come with a message of deterrence, or hate.

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