‘A child’s imagination should not be limited by their gender’

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Image Source: Facebook

A Chicago photographer is offering young boys the opportunity to have their pictures taken dressed up as their favorite princess, saying, “the more photos of boys playing princess we put out there,” the more “normal” it will become.

Kitty Wolf, a photographer, preschool teacher, and former owner of Princesscapades Princess Parties, says she decided to start the Boys Can Be Princesses, Too project after she noticed what she considered to be harmful masculine messaging.

On the website for her new endeavor, she recalls how discouraging it was to see “boys being told that princesses are ‘just for girls’ or that liking princesses and especially dressing as one somehow makes them weak, inferior or not boys.”

“They’re told it’s not manly, or macho, or normal,” Wolf continues. “This leads boys to feel ashamed of their interests, confused, sad, and lonely.”

“I simply feel that a child’s imagination should not be limited by their gender,” Wolf argues. “Therefore, our goal here is to show these boys and world that it is perfectly acceptable for boys to admire and even dress like princesses. I want to show them it’s ok for boys to dress up as their heroes, even if that means they’re twirling around in a ball gown.”

The website includes links to the project’s Facebook and Instagramaccounts as well as a gallery of photos already captured and produced.

Under the “Collaborate” header on the website, it is revealed how others can “help spread our [Boys Can Be Princesses, Too] message around the world.”

Those who become “collaborators” will be allowed to host their own photo shoots in their respective hometowns and have the photos displayed on the Boys Can Be Princesses, Too website with official branding. They would also have their professional information listed on the website as an official collaborator and get best practice tips for “everything from taking the photos to dealing with haters.”

The agenda is simple: to spread the message far and wide.

“The more photos of boys playing princess we put out there, the more people will see them and the more normal it will become!” the website says.

By Phil Shiver/The Black

Posted by The non-Conformist